Botanical Name: Khaya ivorensis

Janka Hardness: 1070 – 20% softer than White Oak

Appearance: Sapwood is pale white to yellow; heartwood ranges from pink-ish brown to a darker shade of brown. Khaya has a moderately coarse texture with interlocked grain. Khaya is also known for its characteristic chatoyant luster, i.e. the wood’s color appears to slightly change as it is moved.

Properties: Shows good resistance to rot and termites. May be vulnerable to beetle attacks. Shows very little movement after seasoning. Responds very well to machine tools.

Finishing: Khaya shows excellent response to finishing.

Applications: Decking, boat building, furniture, interior flooring, paneling, cabinetry, millwork, veneering, plywood.

Khaya, a Genuine contender? With regulations causing a sharp decrease in Genuine Mahogany supply, African Mahogany has emerged as its most popular alternative in the industry. It is even cheaper than Sapele.